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Fred Seibert's Blog

Archive for the ‘cartoon shorts’


Wow! The history continues.

April 16th, 2010

Frederator Postcards Series 9.7
Frederator Postcards Series 9.7, mailed April 16, 2010

We worked with Bob Boyle on two shorts at Oh Yeah! Cartoons, and when he was the art director and producer on The Fairly Oddparents. Eric Homan brought Bob in the door when we started thinking about picture books for pre-schoolers. One of them became a book last month, and the other? You’re looking at it.
……

From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 200 people to receive this limited edition Frederator postcard!
www.frederator.com

History of Frederator Studios
Wow! Wow! Wubbzy!
2006 - ?
Created by Bob Boyle

Executive Producers: Bob Boyle, Susan Miller Lazar, Fred Seibert
A Bolder Media/Starz Production
Bolder Media, a joint venture of Frederator Studios & Mixed Media Group

Series 9.7

Postcard ©2010, Bellport Cartoon Company. Wow!Wow!Wubbzy! ©2010, Bolder Media and Starz. All rights reserved.
……

More Frederator postcards

Why is that girl a robot?

April 2nd, 2010

Frederator Postcards Series 9.5
Frederator Postcard Series 9.5, mailed April 2, 2010

I started working with the extraordinary director Rob Renzetti during 2 Stupid Dogs at Hanna-Barbera Cartoons. He created Mina & the Count for What A Cartoon! and almost made it to series. Four more shorts (and five more Mina’s) at Oh Yeah! Cartoons, and honestly, we both thought we’d be down for the count again. Then, our Nickelodeon executive plucked out MLaaTR from the pack and brought it upstairs, and the rest is robot history.

…..
From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 200 people to receive this limited edition Frederator postcard!
www.frederator.com

History of Frederator Studios
My Life as a Teenage Robot

An Oh Yeah! Cartoons series
2003-2006
Created by Rob Renzetti

Series 9.5

Postcard ©2010, Bellport Cartoon Company. ChalkZone ©2010, Viacom Intl. All rights reserved.

……
More Frederator postcards

Who’s got the chalk?

March 26th, 2010

Frederator Postcards Series 9.4Frederator Postcard Series 9.4, mailed March 26, 2010

As soon as Nickelodeon production Prexy Albie Hecht heard the title ChalkZone he was in (he’s totally a high concept guy). Good thing. I’d lured co-creator Bill Burnett (whom I met through Albie in the first place) from NY to la-la land, and Larry Huber was overseeing all the lunatics in our shorts asylum. It was great when they got their series –the second spin off from Oh Yeah! Cartoons– which launched as the highest rated premiere in Nick history as of 2002.

…..
From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 200 people to receive this limited edition Frederator postcard!
www.frederator.com

History of Frederator Studios
ChalkZone

An Oh Yeah! Cartoons series
2002-2004
Created by Bill Burnett & Larry Huber
Series 9.4

Postcard ©2010, Bellport Cartoon Company. ChalkZone ©2010, Viacom Intl. All rights reserved.

……
More Frederator postcards

Fairly odd? I don’t think so.

March 19th, 2010

Frederator Postcards Series 9.3
Frederator Postcard Series 9.3, mailed March 19, 2010

Butch Hartman’s FOP got the go-ahead for series production while I was in the midst of a cross continent family move, but Butch didn’t lose a beat. He staffed up and started one of the great juggernauts in modern American cartoons.

…..
From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 200 people to receive this limited edition Frederator postcard!
www.frederator.com

History of Frederator Studios
The Fairly OddParents 2001-?
An Oh Yeah! Cartoons series
Created by Butch Hartman

Series 9.3

Postcard ©2010, Bellport Cartoon Company. The Fairly Oddparents ©2010, Viacom Intl. All rights reserved.

……
More Frederator Postcards

The madness begins.

March 10th, 2010

Frederator Postcards Series 9.2
Frederator Postcard Series 9.2, mailed March 5, 2010

After I left Hanna-Barbera and our first big idea incubator, Nickelodeon asked us to set up shop with them.

“Only if we could start a second home for lunatics,” I said.

Lucky for us, Herb Scannell and Albie Hecht agreed, and Oh Yeah! Cartoons was hatched.
…..
From the postcard back:

Congratulations!
You are one of 200 people to receive this limited edition Frederator postcard!
www.frederator.com

History of Frederator Studios
Oh Yeah! Cartoons

1998-2002
Created by Fred Seibert
Executive Producers: Larry Huber & Fred Seibert

Series 9.2

Postcard ©2010, Bellport Cartoon Company. Oh Yeah! Cartoons ©2010, Viacom Intl. All rights reserved.

……
More Frederator Postcards

Coming soon!

January 17th, 2010

Original Cartoons, Volume 2

The long awaited sequel from Frederator Books. Including the first published (!) interview with Eric Homan, a short essay by Bob Osher, the postcards in Series 6, 7, & 8, previews of Series 9 & 10, and more!

We’re aiming for March, 2010.

Marv Newland Takes Festivals by Storm

November 9th, 2009

A Letter from Marv Newland

Marv Newland really gets around! Postalolio, the short that Marv produced with Frederator will be screening all over the world over the coming months. If you’re in any of these countries or states, make sure you come out to support this great film.

04 - 08 November 2009
Holland Animated Film Festival
Utrecht

11 - 15 November 2009
15th Cucalorus Film Festival
Wilmington, North Carolina

03 - 06 November 2009
Les Sommets Du Cinéma D’Animation
Montreal, Canada

25 - 29 November 2009
I Castelli Animati
Italy

01 - 04 April 2010
11th Dawson City International Short Film Festival
at the Klondike Institute of Art
Dawson City, Yukon, Canada

21 - 27 June 2010
Melbourne International Animation Festival
Australia

Congratulations to Marv on gaining entry to these prestigious festivals and best of luck!

A Still from

Blog History of Frederator’s original cartoon shorts. Part 22.

October 25th, 2009

Dexter's Laboratory in
Video frame grabs from Genndy Tartakovsky’s “Dexter’s Laboratory in ‘The Big Sister‘”

Blog History of Frederator’s original cartoon shorts.
Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6. Part 7. Part 8. Part 9. Part 10. Part 11. Part 12. Part 13. Part 14. Part 15. Part 16. Part 17. Part 18. Part 19. Part 20. Part 21.

A server failure at our website caused the loss of our frame grab gallery of What A Cartoon! shorts. It seemed like a good push to add a post to our history.

What A Cartoon! was still an unnamed project of 48 “Looney Tunes length” shorts with more hope than actuality when we started taking pitches in earnest in 1993. No one had attempted anything like this before in the television animation era, and I wasn’t sure that anyone else shared my optimism at the beginning.

The Hanna-Barbera development team, led by Jeff Holder and Ellen Cockrill, with significant input from production head Buzz Potamkin, dug right in. They got the word out, literally all over the world, that the studio had entered an unprecedented phase, and that we were looking for the ideas from all corners. No longer would ours be a top down studio; animators had a better idea what cartoons should be than executives and we were out to support them in every way we could. Eventually, we received storyboards from all over the world, thousands of them. Many from within the studio and from the Los Angeles industry, but from also from schools and international centers of animation. (Occasionally, we even used the then brand new technology of video conferencing to take uncomfortable pitches from Turner Broadcasting’s London office.) In all, the development group estimated we received over 5000 pitches for the 48 slots we were planning.

I was hoping for an idealistic diversity in our filmmakers that could solve the inequities of our business overnight. It wasn’t just a uptopian hope either; I’d seen the direct benefits in other creative businesses like movies, television and music. The wider the palette of creative influences, the wider and bigger the audiences. It was time for cartoons to go in the same direction. And while we received a smattering of pitches from people of color, women, and international creators, it would take us at least 15 years before I really started seeing a clear progression. But, as it was, we had creators from Europe and Canada (like Bruno Bozetto), Asia (like Swamp & Tad), the heartland of the US (Jerry Reynolds), and colleges (like Seth MacFarlane). There were plenty of young series first timers (like Genndy Tartakovsky, Craig McCraken, Rob Renzetti, Butch Hartman, and John Dilworth), but veterans too (like Don Jurwich, Jerry Eisenberg, and Ralph Bakshi).

All in all, it was an incredible process with amazing results (yes, I’m aware of my justified hyperbole). 5000 pitches begat 48 shorts and seven series. No studio had attempted this scale in 30 or 40 years. Each creator was treated just so, as a filmmaker, not a factory worker with hands to do the bidding of management. And though our ends were definitely commercial, I think the results were almost like art films. Not too many voices in the mix, just one creator (or creating team), one film.

I’m very proud of the work everyone did on the What A Cartoon! shorts (eventually promoted as World Premiere Toons on Cartoon Network). Whether it was the development and production groups, marketing, PR, even accounting, we were all there to support the creators who put their asses on the line, pencils on the paper, and came up with original work in a business that hadn’t been interested for a very long time. Viva cartoons!

Video frame grabs from What A Cartoon!
What A Cartoon! titles The Powerpuff Girls in Courage the Cowardly Dog Yucky Duck in Jof in

Blog History of Frederator’s original cartoon shorts.
Part 1. Part 2. Part 3. Part 4. Part 5. Part 6. Part 7. Part 8. Part 9. Part 10. Part 11. Part 12. Part 13. Part 14. Part 15. Part 16. Part 17. Part 18. Part 19. Part 20. Part 21.

“What’s your favorite color?”

February 28th, 2009

Frederator Filmmaker Interviews

The other day I was enjoying some of the interviews Eric and Bailee have been posting, which kicked me to reading some of Jeaux’s and Mike Milo’s and Floyd’s, and it got me wondering. I know we’ve run almost 400 films on Channel Frederator and that we’d interviewed a lot of under exposed filmmakers and artists… But, how many exactly?

One hundred and forty five. Right, 145. And they keep on coming.

There aren’t too many places that play such close attention to the people making animated films, unless they’re Walt Disney or John Lasseter (not that there’s anything wrong with that). And while we can’t begin ton compare our archive to some of the in depth work done by folks like Michael Barrier, Amid Amidi, Jerry Beck, and others, it’s a darn good start I think.

We’re going to keep it up. In addition to the weekly Channel Frederator animated filmmakers, I’ve always thought the dedicated folks who work day to day in our crews deserve a spotlight, and we’ve started that up with the Fanboy & Chum Chum crew. Adventure Time’s crew will be coming up, and we’re going to try and backtrack into our shows like The Fairly Oddparents and Wow! Wow! Wubbzy!

And don’t be surprised when you start reading interviews with some of the (truly) misunderstood production crew and network executives that work on our shows. It takes a lot of people to make even one film, and I think we should try and get to know a little more about them all.

If you’re interested in getting in on the action, we’re always looking for new interviewers too, it’s a lot of work to keep this effort going. If you’re interested, just drop a note to our New York producer Carrie Miller, and she’ll try and get you going.

“The Dan Danger Show” soundtracks

February 9th, 2009

Dan Danger 2002
This post has moved here. So sorry for the inconvenience.